binaakwe-giizis 2010


245px-Ojibwe_bandolier_bag_ca_1930_Nebraska_State_Historical_Society_Collectionbinaakwe-giizis 2010
(Falling Leaves Moon – October)gidakiimanaaniwigamig students looked at local plants and compared them to Ojibwe beadwork floral designs. Woodlands Indians use wild flowers, leaves and fruits to create appliqued designs using the double needle technique. manidoominens is the name for the seeds of the hawthrone tree. The Anishinaabe women used these seeds for beads.

The work of the Botanical Illustrator as visual recorder is a very important tool for theĀ  Botanist.

Catalog of Botanical Illustrations, Smithsonian Botanical Museum

http://botany.si.edu/botart/

http://botany.si.edu/botart/artistGallery.cfm?myArtist=Tangerini,%20A&inWindow=no

History of Native American Beads – The Hawthorne Tree

http://www.kstrom.net/isk/art/beads/hawthorn.html

Watercolor Botanical Illustration

http://www.handprint.com/HP/WCL/artist01.html


Art, gidaa, manoomin, Oral Traditions, Science, Seasonal camp

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